Coronavirus week 15 - 28th June to 5th July

Well tomorrow is the day that we in Wales are released from the "stay local" restriction which has generally been taken to be five miles with a little leeway for those people living in rural locations.  We already have trips planned to the three of our four children who do not live locally.  We haven't seen them and their families since February which feels like a very long time.  In Wales other restrictions remain in place with hospitality businesses, hairdressers and many non essential retailers still closed although schools reopened on a part time basis here at the beginning of this week.  In practical terms this means that ten year old grandson had one day in school this week and another one planned the week after next before school breaks up for the summer.  Nearly five year old granddaughter will have two days in school this week.  While it is nothing like full time education it is a start and a way of being back in touch with friends and teachers before the long summer holidays.  In England pubs reopened on Saturday 4th July and there is a big push to get as much open as possible.  The Education Secretary announced the reopening of schools in September with compulsory attendance.  I much prefer the approach here in Wales which has focused more on getting parents to be comfortable with arrangements and less on compulsion.

So my big project of lockdown, the blanket for Joseph, has had to move on apace ready to be handed over this week.




This has meant many hours working away, even in the day time.  What is it about the work ethic my generation grew up with that makes me feel that to crochet in the day, like reading in the day, is faintly self indulgent?  After all when Ian goes out to the workshop to make or mend something he doesn't seem to feel that it should not be a daytime activity!  Somehow I find myself feeling that I should be weeding or cleaning out cupboards, something which I would enjoy much less than making blankets! It must be the difference between something which feels like a duty and something which is a pleasure in itself!   But this week I have felt entirely justified in pushing on.  It was finally finished yesterday, just in time for delivery this week!

Wednesday was Ian's birthday and we had a visit from younger daughter and her children to celebrate, outside of course!


Maddy had made a cake so we sat outside under the gazebo and sang happy birthday.  There is something entirely delightful in the joy little children take in cake and birthdays!  

There is now the scope to make an "extended household" in Wales by combining two households.  This would allow for shared time inside without social distancing and even overnight stays.  Should we do this or not?  I am finding it very difficult to make these judgments about risk.  In some ways the virus feels very distant and unreal.  The traffic on the roads has pretty much returned to normal.  When we go to the supermarket in Mold or Denbigh very few people are wearing masks.  It would be so easy to slip back into the normal life of pre-lockdown times.  And then I watch the news or read the papers and see interviews with medics or with survivors of coronavirus and am reminded that it is still out there, still a threat.  It looks as though we will have to find a way to live with it, at least for the moment.  My Spanish tutor ran this week's on line class from Spain where he has had to return because his mother is ill, fortunately not with coronavirus but nevertheless ill enough to be in hospital.  He reports an easy flight from the UK but I would still not wish to fly.  Am I too cautious?  Are others not cautious enough?  Only time will tell!

But this week will see us venturing further afield than we have since March!  What will the world look like?  How will it feel?  Will we be able to manage to see grandchildren without hugging them?  That will be a challenge!

How about you?  Do you feel the world is opening up again or are you still at home?

Comments

  1. I can't keep up with the changes happening in England. I have been shielding since the start and will continue to do so, except I am now adding in some local walks (on my own) provided other people maintain the correct distance.

    I feel England is allowing too much, too quickly, with no delay to assess the impact of the changes on the R number. It's difficult for individuals to assess the risk as we don't have access to information on what is happening where we live. So I will continue to take baby steps for now and watch what's happening in my area ... the pubs re-opened on the 4th and police closed three of the four pubs in town on the same day because they weren't following social distancing rules! It's worrying.

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    1. I'm sure you are right to make your own assessment of the risks you are prepared to take especially as you are shielding. I also found myself thinking that busy pubs thronging with drinkers aren't the sort of place I would have gone to before all this so it's no loss to decide not to do so right now. I might try to get the measure of what is happening in some very local places that we know well when Wales lets hospitality business open up but it is not on my list of things I'm missing. Take care. I hope you continue to be able to keep safe.

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  2. Not surprisingly there seems to be a real generational difference in approach to the new freedoms in England. The risk of being seriously affected by the virus is lower the younger you are although, as some medics point out, some younger people have been very badly affected and some, sadly, have died.
    But the vast majority of my contemporaries voice real concerns and anxieties about the rapid way in which restrictions are being lifted here. Younger people, often those without family responsibilities, are seemingly much less concerned. I even heard a young woman on the radio this morning saying she'd travelled from Cardiff to Bristol yesterday in order to join the pub goers.Rather her than me.
    I had to go to the city centre on Friday to sort out an issue with the bank at which my power of attorney for my mother is lodged. I hadn't been anywhere near the city for almost 4 months so went with some trepidation and wearing my mask.
    The bank was well set up for social distancing with ample supplies of hand sanitiser available and the staff were kind and considerate. I came away relieved to have taken what seemed a very big step, and to have got what had been a seemingly intractable situation resolved, but also with some anxiety about the risk I might have taken. But then, as someone said to me the other day, risk is part of life. Balancing the economic impact and the attendant health implications against the very real potential impact on public health of the virus is a really difficult issue and this is where trusting the decision makers is so critical. Would that I had more trust in our political decision makers....

    Great blanket Elizabeth; fantastic work! And belated birthday greetings to Ian.














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    1. I agree wholeheartedly about having to trust decision makers and the problems in doing so! I considered making a trip to a bank too but in the end I found I could do what I needed at our local post office. I'm quite a sociable person who likes travel and meeting people so it is a bit of a surprise to me to find myself much more comfortable on my own patch dealing with familiar faces ! Perhaps this is the way it will be over the coming months. I'll be interested to see how it is to get out to see our children who are mostly many miles away!
      The young are probably right to feel that their risks are low from what our doctor son says. Unfortunately it's not a simple thing for those of us who are older or less well!

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  3. I love the new blanket. Even though the only cases here for some weeks have been people returning to the country, who are in isolation anyway, I am still nervous of going to indoor venues. Have just been on a Parkinson's walk which was o.k. as we are outside but we did not go to the cafe afterwards and I chickened out on going to the first Senior Net meeting since Lockdown. Good to hear you can finally catch up with family again.

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    1. Think we have taken the message about keeping safe and staying home so much to heart that there will be a psychological hurdle to get over when we get back out in the world. At least things are pretty safe in new Zealand! ๐Ÿ˜Š

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  4. I live in the US and the news is grim on many levels. I am very cautious, but the media is showing many who are not. I miss my family but have been able to get together outside and social distanced. You are very fortunate to have a celebration for your grandchild’s birthday.

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    1. Yes indeed, the news from the US and also from Brazil is very worrying. I hope you can stay safe. Meeting outside seems to be very much safer than being inside so that is our focus at the moment. Mind you, it would help if it stopped rainin !

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  5. Replies
    1. Gracias marcheline.
      !Me gustaria otra para mi ahora!

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  6. I love your green gazebo! We continue in Spain new normality. I´m cautious all the time when I have a get together or hang out in cafes with family or friends.
    Wearing a mask when it´s 32ยบ isn´t at all confortable!.
    We are starting in some hours some holidays at a spa resort at Montanejos to relax and to switch off some days.

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    1. Yes we are cautious too. Enjoy your holiday. I hope you have a lovely relaxing time.

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